HomeForumsMembers’ Builds and RidesVQ – WN StatesmanAtlas Grey VQ Statesman 304

This topic contains 133 replies, has 16 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of McDriveit McDriveit 1 year, 6 months ago.

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  • #19230
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    [TUFFVQ]
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    Member since: March 2, 2015
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    I’ve been replacing the Summit Racing brand hose and fittings, not because they’ve failed or anything but because my garage is attached to my house – after a drive half the house smells like fuel (and oil, but we already talked about that).

    Stating the obvious – Speedflow 200 series really adds up quickly…

    #19236
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    cava454
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    Lol. Very quickly. I get a really good price on Speedflow.  :nice:

    #19238
    Profile photo of VRSenator065
    VRSenator065
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    • Adelaide SA
    • VR Senator LSx454 1960 Kombi (project) 1921 Nash Hot Rod (future project)

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    I actually have Aeroflow all through mine, I know it has a bad rap but so far no issues.

    #19242
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    gtrboyy
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    Member since: January 20, 2016
    Posts: 193

    Bung some nulon oil stop leak…well known engine builder said try it on a motor gain some more time before engine comes out.

     

    Tried it & improved the leak heaps..also went thicker hpr30 instead of piss-thin 10/60 oil.

    Now down to slow drip on extractors instead of smokescreen lol.

    #19258
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    [TUFFVQ]
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    I actually have Aeroflow all through mine, I know it has a bad rap but so far no issues.

    I’ve got a variety of fittings around the place. I measured up some of the earlier “-6” fittings from Aeroflow and Proflow (straight connectors about 5 years old) and they were 1.0mm smaller on the I.D. than Speedflow -6 (i.e. 8.5mm vs 9.5mm). I’ll be using a combination of teflon hose and hardline under the car also to try and reduce costs. Before I bought the car 12 odd years ago some muppet crushed the factory fuel lines on the sill so they’re about half the size they should be.

    However for the breather system I’ll be building later on I’ll be using literal China-bay -10 fittings and cheap push lock. I’m not shelling out $400 or more for breather system hoses.

    Thanks for the tip on the oil stop leak. I’ll probably do nothing until I pull the motor though, knowing me.

    #19262
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    gtrboyy
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    Member since: January 20, 2016
    Posts: 193

    For yours I’d go 2 breather fittings in manifold valley with baffle plates underneath…catchcan in plenum.

    Then seal smooth where old breathers were…maybe add small drainback pipes near bottom of rocker cover to sump.

    Would look cool on this.

     

    Other way is on top of rocker cover,not look as neat but should work better than from front although barely pump much oil unless blowby issue.

     

    My shitter seems to have more moisture/water in it than oil whenever crack drain bolt of 5ltr catchcan.

    #19277
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    [TUFFVQ]
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    General line of thought was a -10 in the valley and 2 x -10’s on the rocker covers.

    Current engine breathes a bit but it was all dunny brush honed by a power drill in my garage, then I don’t even think I file-fit the rings! So I’m not surprised.

    #19278
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    cava454
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    I only had -12 valley (no baffle) and 2x -12 out front of rocker covers. To a catch can full of steel wool. Good enough

     

    drain backs aren’t need unless you plan on high rpm for extended periods of time

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 12 months ago by Profile photo of cava454 cava454.
    #19280
    Profile photo of VRSenator065
    VRSenator065
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    • Adelaide SA
    • VR Senator LSx454 1960 Kombi (project) 1921 Nash Hot Rod (future project)

    • View build HERE
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    All engines breathe a little at high rpm/load, just the nature of the beast.

    #19332
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    gtrboyy
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    Member since: January 20, 2016
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    Tuff made that manifold..dude got skills to do overkill breather system & make it look good.

     

    Agree when engine is good/rebuilt not really needed & overkill.

    After seeing allports(rip) build stroker 355 circuit & drag engines I liked theory of large catchcan helps relieve high windage volume you get with these….larger gap rings etc then add stroker crank swinging around in tight confines.

    These were on many engines minimal ring leakdown & no oil leaks even after few years use.Most did get refreshed every year yet still insisted customers do it.

    Other thing I like is catchcan should be highest point.

    #19376
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    [TUFFVQ]
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    OK So got the boot finished last night.

    Sourced a replacement boot carpet and trimmed to suit (I got rid of the boot carpet years ago). Re-ran all the wiring for the line lock and fuel pump (new fused relays, lost of heat shrink, split tubing, cable clamps and riv-nuts). Finished mounting the pump and surge with the new base plate and hard lines.

    My Delcohacking parts arrived yesterday, so this weekend I’ll hopefully mod the ECU to suit and start causing myself a huge headache in trying to tune the thing :)

    #19379
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    VRSenator065
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    • Adelaide SA
    • VR Senator LSx454 1960 Kombi (project) 1921 Nash Hot Rod (future project)

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    Pics or it didn’t happen ;-)

    #19442
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    [TUFFVQ]
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    I took a couple but for some reason it looks really dirty when using the flash on the phone. So I’ll wait until I roll it outside again.

    So I got most of the way there on Friday night to getting the ECU side of it sorted. I have connectivity  between the laptop and the ECU via USB, and made the required hardware mods, but ran out of time to go any further. Real-time dash works as well, which is a good sign. Hopefully I’ll get into it properly soon.

    #19501
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    [TUFFVQ]
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    OK Modified ECU is a go. Took the car for its first drive last night with the NVRAM installed. I have an Innovate LC-1 Wideband which I am yet to connect to the ECU (Pin D9?), I’ll have to do this sooner rather than later.

    A re-cap – The intake manifold on this car is a VN Group A replica I built about 8 or 9 years ago as my first aluminium project (It doesn’t look great – if I built it again it would look much better!). It runs the same plenum volume as the factory unit with 2 inch longer runners at 44mm dia. (10″ total bellmouth to valve head).

    First thing first, it seems as though the way my intake manifold works needs to be looked at. It runs twin 60mm V6 throttles which open simultaneously. The IAC port on the secondary throttle is welded closed, however it seems as though there is still too much airflow getting into the engine as I have ~50KPa at idle. From what I understand I should be aiming for 25-30kPa? I’ll have to look at if there is a vacuum leak also (i suspect there might) as the manifold was not machined after all of the welding.

    As such, the car is typically idles around 900-1000rpm with the occasional fluctuation. I want it to be lower than this. I also have the IAC sitting on 3 steps at this time, which suggests to me the IAC is fully closed and is still not able to meet the target idle speed (at 750rpm for now).

    The next issue is TPS. With the throttle fully closed it sits on 0% readout (I expected it would have been a couple of %?), and since the throttles actuate simultaneously, it requires stuff all throttle input to move along (2-3%). This hasn’t been an issue for me driving it as i’m used to it, and also the convertor takes up some of the slack, but I would like to change this for both driveability and the fact that (as I understand it) it would mean I’m doing a bit of cruising on the idle table. When rolling into the throttle, I can obtain 90-100kPa with as little as 35-40% TPS. This would also be to do with the actuation of the throttles, as well as the flow of the top end of the engine (heads and intake). This manifold was designed to be run on a much stronger engine, I just never got around to building something better.

    I’ve noticed also that I can make wholesale changes on the 20-100kPa VE table and unless I’m getting up it, it makes no difference as far as I can tell to the mixtures. I think this is to do with the above.

    So in summary, I’m guessing my best approach would be to look at the throttles, check for vac leaks, hookup the wideband and start logging. Oh, and get more familiar with the tables!

    #19505
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    VRSenator065
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    Not sure about everyhting else but you should really be able to screw down the idle screw until it stalls as the butterflies are basically totally closed and so there is no air getting to the engine.  If you cant slow the idle down it means the air is getting into the manifold somehow.  Vacuum hose leak somewhere, leaking throttle blade shaft(s), distorted throttle bodies and/or butterflies not allowing a good seal, leaking gaskets are all potential mechanical reasons why.

    #19510
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    [TUFFVQ]
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    Yeah I have to investigate.

    Tempted to leave as is until I pull the engine also…. (But I’ve said that about problems I’ve had with the car for many years so don’t expect much).

    #19511
    Profile photo of VRSenator065
    VRSenator065
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    • Adelaide SA
    • VR Senator LSx454 1960 Kombi (project) 1921 Nash Hot Rod (future project)

    • View build HERE
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    solving problems is part and parcel of having a modified car unfortunately.  No doubt you will sort it, post up when you do, good to know what the issues was :good:

    #19519
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    [TUFFVQ]
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    After consulting with the gurus on delcohacking, it turns out that my idle manifold pressure isn’t really all that unexpected. Still, I’ll have a look at what I can do to make it a bit better.

    #19701
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    [TUFFVQ]
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    OK, I’ve been tinkering here and there with the tune on this.

    I now have it idling in a pretty stable manner at 700-750rpm. It actually sounds like it has a non-standard cam in it now! (It’s only been in there for 7 years…)
    Target spark advance is 26* at idle, with 50kPa manifold pressure and ~13.5:1 AFR when warmed up. Smells a lot less ‘fuelly’ on idle now as well. Another bonus.

    I’ve been working on a timing map that is a lot smoother and more aggressive than stock, which I’ll try running this weekend. Still need to adjust the VE table to suit the engine, as well as link the wideband to the ECU.

    #19741
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    [TUFFVQ]
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    Connected the Wideband to the ECU, works a treat. Logging with this input in now is a very powerful tool. It’s quite easy to see when and where it needs more or less fuel through history tables, running averages etc etc.

    Having fun playing around with all the data.

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