HomeForumsTechnical – GeneralECU & TuningPassing a IM240 emissions test NSW

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  • #8491
    Profile photo of HDN05L
    HDN05L
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    Just wandering if anyone has had first hand experience getting their modified car ( turbo ,supercharged ) through a IM 240 emissions test in NSW?

    I am booked in to get my car checked for engineering in a month and wondered if there are any tips.

    I will be running new cats and O2 sensors. The motor is standard with the exception of the side mount charger and extractors.

    Any feedback would be great. Thanks

    #10676
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    SLO 05L
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    Member since: March 17, 2015
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    how did u go mate?

    #10784
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    HDN05L
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    Yeah not to good. I have been 3 times now for this test and i’m so close its not funny.

    Ive decided to put it on hold and register the car then my tuner will take it up to Sydney next year and tune it while running the test. Its not as straight forward as people think it has passed the levels needed for a vr commodore but because of my build plate being 2000 i fall under tougher levels.

    It will be great when its finally done.

    #10797
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    VRSenator065
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    Its not as straight forward as people think

    Yep, its a right pita!!  Bummer mate, so what cats are you running?

    #10805
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    VRSenator065
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    Hey mate i just came across this and posted it in the other emissions thread but thought it might be useful for you?

    http://www.type2.com/library/exhaust/comix.htm

    Failed the CO

    Check the Mixture and Ignition Timing. Especially on VWs, over advance timing will cause high CO readings. When setting up ignition timing, mixture, and idle speed, follow the book. On Digijet Vanagons, disconnect and bypass the Idle Stabilizer when setting the timing and idle speed. Resist the temptation to “advance” the timing for performance. Also make sure both the vacuum and mechanical advance mechanisms are working properly. On Digifant Vans, Disconnect the Temperature Sensor before setting the timing. Again, resist the urge to over advance the timing. Check the O2 sensor system to ensure it is working properly. Resist the urge to adjust the Airflow box. If the O2 sensor system is working properly, it will compensate unless some one has already made a mess of things. Also check the oil, diluted oil will also cause high CO readings. Worn rings and valve guides will contribute to this also. However this will only be a problem on very tired engines. Setting the idle speed around 1000 rpm will also help keep the CO readings down.

    Failed the HC

    Check the ignition system first. This usually caused by an ignition miss. Then check the engine. Poorly seated valves, leaking head gaskets, or other compression problems will put the HC readings through the roof. Also check for vacuum leaks and the injector spray patterns. Remember, HC failures are usually caused by compression or ignition problems. Improper fuel distribution/vacuum leaks will cause misfires that will cause excessive HC.

    Failed both CO and HC

    If the HC is very high and the CO is close, you probably have an ignition/compression related problem. If the CO is very high and the HC is close, than you may only have a timing/mixture problem. Use the above procedures accordingly and you should be able to resolve your emissions failure blues. Next time, we will talk about all that infamous junk they put on our cars to control the emissions. I will explain the purpose of these devices that you can better troubleshoot your cars and also to help you decide which equipment is worth maintaining or discarding when searching for more performance. One thing to keep in mind is that much of this equipment is put on our cars because we don’t maintain them. That’s why some car manufactures are shooting for 100,000 mile maintenance intervals.

    #10817
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    HDN05L
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    Interesting read thanks Gary. I was running twin inline euro 4 cats.

    The issue was my new ems decided to go into limp mode for the test which just made everything rich used 0.5L of extra fuel, which lifted the levels to high. Nox and C02 are not a problem its the Thc and Co that killed me this time. Like i said previously it passed 96 standards but because its a 2000 build plate they get tougher on readings.

    All good though registered the car today and will put everything back on cruise for a while then go back up with the tuner next year and he will tweak it in the test.

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